Federal Aviation Administration News

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign is designed to educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

A Loss of Control (LOC) accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

Digital Engine Control
Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) means there is no direct pilot control over the engine or manual control mode. FADEC shares advantages with electronic ignition and electronic engine control systems, but it takes power management several steps further:

  • FADEC systems are autonomous, self-monitoring, self-operating and redundant. If the FADEC fails, the engine fails. However, redundancy makes it much less likely that a FADEC system will fail. In fact, a double magneto failure, the aircraft components that supply electrical power to the spark plugs, is statistically more likely than a FADEC failure.
  • FADEC combines throttle, propeller, and mixture controls into a single control. Every throttle setting at any altitude results in the optimum power/propeller revolution per minute or RPM/mixture combination. FADEC enables pilots to experience a vast improvement in fuel economy.
  • Automatic engine performance monitoring provides over-speed and over-boost protection throughout the operation. Pilots can command maximum power, and the system will deliver that power without exceeding limitations.
  • FADECs diagnostic processes constantly monitor the health of the aircrafts power plant. Small problems are found before they become big problems, which is why FADEC can help make your aircraft much more efficient.

You might ask is it hard to adjust to using a FADEC system? Well, it may take some time to get used to FADEC at first, but you will come to trust the system. The biggest hurdle is realizing the system provides no reversion to manual control.

Sometimes, pilots have run engines beyond operational limits in order to get out of tight situations. You cant do that with FADEC. Maximum allowable power is always available, but no more than that.

A few GA manufacturers are using FADEC now, but we expect to see more in the future.

Message from FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta:
The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #Fly Safe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

More about Loss of Control
Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • In 2016, 413 people died in 219 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:
Read more about FADEC in FAA Advisory Circular 33.28-1, Compliance Criteria for 14CFR 33.28-1, Aircraft Engines, Electrical and Electronic Engine Control Systems.

You can learn more about FADEC in this FAA fact sheet.

Check out more GA Safety Enhancements fact sheets on the mainFAA Safety Briefingwebsite.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

Enjoy your Holiday Laser-light Display-Responsibly

Each holiday season for the past several years, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has received reports from pilots who said they were distracted or temporarily blinded by residential laser-light displays.

The FAA's concerns about lasers regardless of the source is that they not be aimed at aircraft in a way that can threaten the safety of a flight by distracting or blinding the pilots. People may not realize that systems they set up to spread holiday cheer can also pose a potential hazard to pilots flying overhead.

So if youre going to install a holiday laser-light system, please make sure the lights are hitting your house and not shining up into the sky. It may not look like the lights go much farther than your house, but the extremely concentrated beams of laser lights actually reach much further than most people think.

If the FAA becomes aware of a situation where a laser-light display affects pilots, we start by asking the owner to adjust them or turn them off. However, if someone's laser-light display repeatedly affects pilots despite previous warnings, that person could face an FAA civil penalty.

The Administrator's Fact Book is Back

The Administrators Fact Book has returned, and its on-line.

Years back, one of the most popular FAA documents was a little white book that contained invaluable information about the FAA and air transportation. Through pages upon pages of tables, graphics, and other materials, a story was told of how U.S. aviation works.Entitled The Administrators Fact Book, the monthly publication was unfortunately discontinued in 2012, but has returned and will eventually be converted into a digital format.

The document contains sections on aviation safety, air traffic, airports, aircraft, industry, commercial space transportation, pilots, general information, and FAA resources. The wide variety of materials presented can range from the FAAs annual budget, to airspace incident ratesfrom the number of people flying to the numbers of commercial space transportation launches and unmanned aircraft systems.

Much of the data, prior to the posting of Fact Book, could be found in various locations on the website, but today, the Fact Book materials and data are largely located in one location on the FAA website.

In addition, the data is sourced for accuracy and dated as to when the materials were last amended. Officially, the document is intended to be updated monthly, however, some data, such as the FAA budget for example, is displayed yearly. There is however some information, such as certain numbers relating to Unmanned Aircraft Systems, or drones, that may actually be presented in a monthly format.

It is the FAAs hope that with the return of The Administrators Fact Book, you will use this valuable aviation resource.

Researchers Release Report on Drone Airborne Collisions

A research team from the Alliance for System Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE) today released a report that concludes that drones that collide with large manned aircraft can cause more structural damage than birds of the same weight for a given impact speed.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will use the research results to help develop operational and collision risk mitigation requirements for drones. ASSURE conducted its research with two different types of drones on two types of aircraft through computer modeling and physical validation testing.

Unlike the soft mass and tissue of birds, most drones are made of more rigid materials. The testing showed that the stiffest components of the drone such as the motor, battery and payload can cause the most damage. Concentrating those masses on the drone can also cause greater damage, the researchers found.

The research team evaluated the potential impacts of a 2.7-lb. quadcopter and 4 lb. quadcopter; and a 4-lb. and 8-lb. fixed wing drone on a single-aisle commercial transport jet and a business jet. They examined impacts to the wing leading edge, the windshield, and the vertical and horizontal stabilizers. The windshields generally sustained the least damage and the horizontal stabilizers suffered the most serious damage.

The structural damage severity levels ranged from no damage to failure of the primary structure and penetration of the drone into the airframe. However, the research specifically did not explore the risk to flight imposed by that damage. The researchers concluded that unmanned aircraft system manufacturers should adopt detect and avoid or geo-fencing capabilities to reduce the probability of collisions with other aircraft.

The team conducted a preliminary computer simulation to evaluate the potential damage to engine components if a drone is ingested into an aircraft engine, including damage to fan blades, the nacelle and the nosecone. They plan future additional research on engine ingestion in collaboration with engine manufacturers, as well as additional airborne collision studies with helicopters and general aviation aircraft.

In 2014 Congress directed the FAA to establish a UAS Center of Excellence. The FAA selected ASSURE, led by Mississippi State University, in May 2015.

Set a Course for Sim City!

The November/December 2017 Sim City issue of FAA Safety Briefing explores the exciting world of flight simulation technology and its evolving impact on aviation safety. Feature articles focus on the many flight simulation options now available to pilots, as well as how simulation can improve flight training efficiency.

Feature articles include:

The link to the online edition is www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing. Be sure to also follow us on Twitter@FAASafetyBrief

FAA Safety Briefingis the safety policy voice for the non-commercial general aviation community.The magazine's objective is to improve safety by:

  • making the community aware of FAA resources
  • helping readers understand safety and regulatory issues, and
  • encouraging continued training

FAA Air Traffic Report

Today's Air Traffic Report:

Heavy Thanksgiving traffic is expected along the East Coast today. Low clouds, rain and wind in the Northeast could delay flights in Boston (BOS) and the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA). Low clouds also are expected this morning in Charlotte (CLT) and Seattle (SEA). Thunderstorms in the Gulf of Mexico and off the Southeast coast may lead to additional delays.

Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.

For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.

The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.

Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control

Did you know that most general aviation fatal accidents are caused by in-flight loss of control? Many of these loss of control accidents are caused by factors related to engine failure. Between 2001 and 2010, engine maintenance errors were identified as a contributing factor in 35 of 70 randomly-selected accidents.

Is Your Engine Up to Snuff?
Your engine is the heartbeat of your aircraft, and when youre flying, you certainly want it to perform without a hitch. Numerous accidents happen needlessly because important maintenance was ignored or performed poorly. How many times have we heard of an accident or emergency landing because of an engine malfunction indication, or worse, an engine failure?

Ensure your safety by making sure your airplanes ticker is humming along at its best. Proper engine maintenance, post-maintenance, advanced pre-flights, and engine performance monitoring can go a long way in eliminating needless, inconvenient, expensive, and potentially fatal consequences.

Good Maintenance Practices:

  • Get to know your airplane, and your mechanic
    -Work with your mechanic to make sure the aircraft is operated and maintained properly. Review inspection results and talk to your mechanic about any applicable Airworthiness Directives and Service Bulletins.
  • Dont ignore regular maintenance
    -You cant simply pull off to the shoulder when you are in an aircraft. You need to have all parts of the airplane functioning, and functioning well.
  • Comply with all manufacturer-recommended service intervals.
  • Fifty-hour oil changes are recommended for most normally-aspirated piston engines.
  • Turbo-charged engines should undergo oil changes more frequently.
  • Check the oil filter with each oil change
    -Checking the oil will tell you a lot about engine health. Several samples will create a trend.
  • At every other oil change, do a compression check and check magneto timing, spark plugs, and the exhaust system.

Advanced Preflight After Maintenance:

Maintenance-related problems and the pilots failure to catch them can lead to disastrous consequences.

  • After maintenance, be sure to conduct a preflight that goes above-and-beyond the normal before you take flight again.
  • Look at your aircrafts maintenance history. Develop an extra checklist, as necessary, and use that checklist every time your aircraft has had maintenance.
  • Become familiar with flight controls or systems prior to maintenance, so you can spot abnormalities later.
  • Review ALL of your aircrafts records, including receipts, work orders, FAA Form 337s (Major Repair and Alteration forms), and approval for return to service tags (8130-3 Forms). Also, locate any Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) data.
  • Talk to your mechanic about the work that he or she did on your aircraft. Pay close attention to the components or systems that underwent repair.
  • Be prepared to abort takeoff if something goes wrong, or doesnt feel right.

Engine Performance Monitoring:

  • Youll get immediate feedback from airspeed indicators, attitude indicators, angle of attack indicators, manifold pressure gauges, RPM gauges, and G-force meters. You will be able to tell if design limitations have or are about to be exceeded. This information is available real time on every flight.
  • Engine diagnostic equipment comes in many different forms. One version is the external, hand-held test kit that attaches to ignition plugs and determines system functionality. A good test kit can check engine compression, magnetos, ignition leads, engine timing, and more.
  • Engine data management systems come in a variety of forms and are offered by many different companies. These devices monitor your engine while you focus on flying the aircraft. They can meter your mixture and exhaust gas temperature (EGT) to optimize lean-of-peak operations. Some systems even offer interpretive software and/or provide professional analysis of your data.
  • A digital/electronic engine control (D/EEC) regulates the function of the injection system to ensure the engine provides the power that it needs. An engine control unit reads several sensors, and then adjusts the engine through a series of actuators. Sensors include ones for airflow, engine cooling, throttle position, and fuel flow.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign is designed to educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

Message from FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta:
The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #Fly Safe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

More about Loss of Control:

Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • In 2016, 413 people died in 219 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:

Check out the GA Safety Enhancement fact sheet on Engine Maintenance and Performance Monitoring. You can also learn more about the important steps you need to take after your airplanes been serviced with our fact sheet on Advanced Preflight After Maintenance. A full list of fact sheets is available at www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.

Read more about engine data management systems in Check Engine! in the May/June 2015 edition of the FAA Safety Briefing.

Advisory Circular 120-113, Best Practices for Engine Time In Service Interval Extensions gives the regulatory requirements for time limitations and time in service intervals for engine overhauls.

Read Chapter 8, Inspection Fundamentals in the FAA Aviation Maintenance Technician Handbook.

The FAASafety.gov website has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars and more on key general aviation safety topics.

The WINGS Pilot Proficiency Program helps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

FAA Fields Prototype UAS Airspace Authorization System

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is evaluating a prototype system that the agency expects will ultimately provide near real-time processing of airspace authorization requests for unmanned aircraft (UAS) operators nationwide. The system is designed to automatically approve most requests to operate in specific areas of airspace below designated altitudes.

The FAA has deployed the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability(LAANC) for drone operators at several air traffic facilities in an evaluation to see how well the prototype system functions and to address any issues that arise during testing. Two agency-approved companies, AirMap and Skyward, are currently providing LAANC services. During the evaluation, the FAA may sign agreements with additional providers who responded to the original request for information.

The prototype evaluation will last until next Spring. The FAA plans to launch a national Beta test shortly thereafter. The exact details of the test will be determined by the outcome of the prototype evaluation. The agency also plans to solicit participation from new industry partners at a later date.

Under the FAAs small drone rules formally known as Part 107 operators need to secure approval from the agency to operate in any airspace controlled by an air traffic facility. LAANC is the first application developed by industry in response to this operational need.

LAANC uses airspace data provided through the UAS facility maps The maps show the maximum altitude around airports where the FAA may authorize operations under Part 107. LAANC gives drone operators the ability to interact with the maps and provide automatic notification and authorization requests to the FAA.

LAANC is the first UAS tool that delivers drone information to air traffic control and is the first step in developing Unmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management System (UTM).

Check the FAAs UAS Data Exchange website frequently for updates and additional information.

FAA Approves Drone to Restore Puerto Rico Cell Service

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) quickly approved the first unmanned aircraft operation of its kind to help restore cellular service in Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria.

The Flying COW (Cell on Wings) drone, developed by AT&T, functions like a cell tower in the sky, restoring voice, data and internet service. It flies up to 200 feet above the ground, covering an area of 40 square miles, and is particularly useful in remote areas.

The Pulse Vapor 55 drone, which resembles a miniature helicopter, is fitted with LTE radios and antennas and is tethered to ground-based electronics and power systems. Because the aircraft exceeded the 55-lb. weight limit required to operate under the FAAs small drone rule, the FAA had to issue a special exemption and an emergency certificate of authorization for AT&T to conduct its mission.

The company is using the drone as a temporary cell service solution while it rebuilds the permanent infrastructure on the island.

FAA Asks for Public Comment on Drone Design Standards

For the first time, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is seeking public comments on proposed airworthiness criteria for an unmanned aircraft system, more popularly known as a drone.

The Federal Register notice asks for comments on proposed design standards needed for the FlightScan Corporation Camcopter S-100 to fly safely in U.S. airspace. The ultimate goal of this and other projects is to grant FAA airworthiness certification to fully functional, ready-to-operate unmanned aircraft. The S-100 is the first unmanned aircraft to have its certification basis published.

The Camcopter S-100 is a vertical take-off drone that looks much like a traditional helicopter. It is powered by a liquid-cooled rotary engine and has a maximum take-off weight of 440 pounds including its payload. The drones main purpose is to conduct airborne surveying of power transmission infrastructure using aerial photography.

FlightScan applied for FAA certification of the S-100 using the special class provisions under Part 21.17(b) of FAA regulations in June of 2015. Since then, the agency has worked with the company to develop airworthiness criteria that support safe integration of the S-100 into the National Airspace System.

After the comment period ending December 18, 2017, the FAA will evaluate the public comments to determine if any changes should be made to the proposed airworthiness criteria.

Collaborating for Aviation's Future

WASHINGTON As his term at the Federal Aviation Administration comes to an end early next year, FAA Administrator Michael Huerta spoke today at the Aero Club in Washington, D.C. With a perspective spanning more than seven years at the agency, his remarks focused on the importance of building partnerships with stakeholders to continue advancing Americas global leadership on aviation.

The only way forward was to foster a more constructive relationship with the aviation community, Huerta said. The result is the safest, largest, most complex, and most efficient air transportation system the world has ever known. And its something we accomplished together.

Under Huertas leadership, the FAA worked closely with industry and a variety of advisory committees to prioritize the rollout of airspace modernization technologies like Data Communications and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B). The agency also streamlined how it certifies new small general aviation aircraft, incorporated risk management into its oversight work, and completed its first regulations for the use of small unmanned aircraft.

Huerta recognized that incorporating new stakeholders, like drone users and technology companies, into the FAAs decision-making processes will be essential to continue making progress in the future.

Our aviation family is only going to keep expanding. Our table has to grow with it, he said. We need to hear from a broad range of voices if we're going to get things right.

Huerta also encouraged the entire aviation community to engage in transparent and frank discussions about how to best position our nations aviation system to meet the demands of the future.

The sky above our heads is one of this nations most valuable assets. We must protect it, and help it thrive, Huerta said. Weve got some tough questions to answer. But Im confident were prepared to face them head on.

New FAA Guidance for Electronic Flight Bags

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an updated Advisory Circular (AC) for aircraft system designers, installers and operators seeking design and use guidance for hosting electronic flight bag (EFB) applications on both portable devices and installed equipment.

The AC includes significant changes from the last guidance in May 2014 that offer industry new EFB applications and the ability to manage their EFB programs with significantly less FAA involvement. An EFB is an electronic information management device that helps flight crews perform flight management tasks more easily and efficiently with less paper.

The FAA worked closely with industry, other regulatory authorities, and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Operations Panel to harmonize EFB guidance. Specifically, the new policy eliminates all guidance associated with EFB classification, clarifies the definition of an EFB, and reorganizes EFB application software types according to safety importance.

This newest guidance document also made two significant changes requested by aviation stakeholders. First, the FAA is removing its previous prohibition on the display of aircraft location during flight on various EFB applications. Previously, this function was only available on the ground. In addition, new EFB program management guidance will permit the operator to make many of the day-to-day changes to EFB applications without having to contact their FAA principal inspector.

FAA Grants Waiver for Aerotain Skye to Fly over People

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has granted a waiver from the agencys small drone rules (Part 107) to Cevitasnow in Columbus, OH, to allow the company to operate a helium-filled Aerotain Skye tethered aircraft over people on the ground.

The Aerotain Skye resembles a tethered floating beach ball, but is technically an aircraft. It carries a camera and small motors for propulsion. The Skyes diameter is about 7.5 feet and it weighs about 14 lbs. deflated. The envelope is filled with helium.

There is no location limitation in the waiver, so Cevitasnow can operate anywhere in uncontrolled airspace. An airspace authorization or waiver from the FAA is required for flights in controlled airspace, just as for any other drone operator.

The Cevistasnow waiver is part of the FAAs continuing effort to expand drone operations in the nations airspace while reducing risks to public safety and security.

Comment Period Opens November 10 for the Cleveland Detroit Metroplex Project

November 9The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has prepared a Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Cleveland-Detroit Metroplex project that will be available for public comment beginning on Friday, November 10, 2017. The comment period will end on Monday, December 11, 2017.

Electronic versions of the Draft EA also will be available at 68 libraries in the study area. Residents may comment on the document electronically, through the U.S. mail, or at any of six open-house workshops, which will be held in late November and early December. Three of the workshops will be held in the Detroit metropolitan area, and three will be held in the Cleveland area.

The projects proposed action would improve the efficiency of air traffic in and around the Cleveland and Detroit metropolitan areas. The project uses satellite-based technology to create changes to aircraft flight routes and altitudes in certain areas. Many of the routes overlay existing flight paths. It does not increase the number of aircraft taking off and landing, and it does not result in ground disturbance. Instead, the project develops more climbs and descents on departure and arrival routes, which can result in fewer delays. It enhances safety, and modernizes air traffic procedures to todays standards.

The study area includes 12 airports areas around Cleveland and Detroit, including Cleveland Hopkins International Airport and Detroit Metro Airport.

The FAA invites the public to review the documents before attending informational workshops at the times and locations listed below. Representatives from the FAA will be available to answer questions and will accept written comments.

Detroit Area WorkshopsNovember 28, 2017
5-8 p.m.Ford Community and Performing Arts Center (Hubbard Ballroom
15801 Michigan Ave., Dearborn, MI, 48126November 29, 2017
5-8 p.m.Dozier Recreation Complex (Meeting Lounge)
2025 Middlebelt Road, Inkster, MI, 48141November 30, 2017
5-8 p.m.Sumpter Township Community Center (Gymnasium)
23501 Sumpter Road, Belleville, MI, 48111Cleveland Area WorkshopsDecember 5, 2017
5-8 p.m.Don Umerley Civic Center (Memorial Hall)
21016 Hilliard Blvd., Rocky River, OH, 44116December 6, 2017
5-8 p.m.Gunning Park Recreation Center (Gymnasium)
16700 Puritas Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44135December 7, 2017
5-8 p.m.Baldwin Wallace University Student Union/Strosacker Hall (Sandstone 3 Conference Room)
120 East Grand St., Berea, OH 44017

The FAA will make every reasonable effort to accommodate special needs. People with special communication or accommodation needs may contact Bill Keller of ATAC Corp. at 408-736-2822 at least two days prior to the workshop.

Email comments to: 9-ASW-CLE-DTWOAPM Comment@faa.gov

Comments can be submitted by regular mail to:
CLE-DTW Metroplex EA
Federal Aviation Administration
Central Service CenterOperations Support Group
10101 Hillwood Pkwy, 4th Floor South
Fort Worth, TX 76177

The comment period will close on Monday, December 11, 2017.

FAA Enhances China Aviation Safety Partnership

October 27 The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) today announced the signing of an implementing agreement under the U.S. China Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) recognizing each others regulatory systems with respect to the airworthiness of aviation products and articles.

The Implementation Procedures for Airworthiness (IPA) document allows each authority to leverage approvals completed by the other with respect to design, production, and airworthiness as well as continued airworthiness. The agreement uses the compatibilities of the two authorities certification systems and fulfills the commitment that the U.S. and China made in 2005 with the establishment of a BASA. This IPA also allows both the FAA and the CAAC to submit applications for validation for all categories of aviation products and addresses globalization challenges such as complex business models separating design and production.

This agreement supports the FAA Aircraft Certification Services refresh of certification strategy by responding to stakeholder needs and promoting the seamless transfer of products and approvals globally.

President Trump and Secretary Chao Announce Drone Integration Pilot Program

October 25WASHINGTON President Donald J. Trump directed U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao today to launch an initiative to safely test and validate advanced operations for drones in partnership with state and local governments in select jurisdictions. The Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration Pilot Program implements a directive signed by President Trump today, and the results will be used to accelerate the safe integration of UAS into the national airspace and to realize the benefits of unmanned technology in our economy.

The program will help tackle the most significant challenges in integrating drones into the national airspace while reducing risks to public safety and security. The program is designed to provide regulatory certainty and stability to local governments and communities, UAS owners and operators who are accepted into the program. In less than a decade, the potential economic benefit of integrated unmanned aerial systems into the nations airspace is estimated to equal up to $82 billion and create up to 100,000 jobs.*

The program will help the USDOT and FAA develop a regulatory framework that will allow more complex low-altitude operations; identify ways to balance local and national interests; improve communications with local, state and tribal jurisdictions; address security and privacy risks; and accelerate the approval of operations that currently require special authorizations.

This program supports the Presidents commitment to foster technological innovation that will be a catalyst for ideas that have the potential to change our day-to-day lives, said Secretary Chao. Drones are proving to be especially valuable in emergency situations, including assessing damage from natural disasters such as the recent hurricanes and the wildfires in California.

The pilot program will evaluate a variety of operational concepts, including night operations, flights over people, flights beyond the pilots line of sight, package delivery, detect-and-avoid technologies, counter-UAS security operations, and the reliability and security of data links between pilot and aircraft. Industries that could see immediate opportunities from the program include commerce, photography, emergency management, precision agriculture, and infrastructure inspections and monitoring.

Stakeholders will have the opportunity through this program to demonstrate how their innovative technological and operational solutions can address complex unmanned aircraft integration challenges, said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. At the same time, the program recognizes the importance of community participation in meaningful discussions about balancing local and national interests related to integrating unmanned aircraft.

Prospective local government participants should partner with the private sector to develop pilot proposals.

After evaluating all of the applications, the U.S. Department of Transportation will invite a minimum of five partnerships. In the coming days, the Department will publish a Federal Register Notice with more details about how applications will be evaluated and how the program will work.

For more information:

FAA Hosts Fifth General Aviation Summit

October 24 Were pleased with where general aviation safety is headed. The numbers arent final, but it looks like 2017 will end up being our safest year yet. Working together with industry to meaningfully address safety is making a difference and were going to continue our collaboration to make GA even safer.

Its an issue that needs to be approached from many angles some regulatory, some technological, some educational. And thats the driving force behind the fifth annual General Aviation Safety Summit we held with our government and industry partners today.

Weve made substantial progress since last years gathering. The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) continues to implement targeted safety enhancements. We finalized the Part 23 rule that will help decrease the time to get safety-enhancing technologies for small airplanes to the marketplace. The Fly Safe educational campaign has reached millions of our social media followers with information on how to avoid loss of control accidents. And in collaboration with aviation training community experts, last summer we updated key elements of the airman certification system to include an enhanced focus on risk management.

Theres no silver bullet when it comes to making GA safer. We have to remain vigilant and keep finding new ways to advance our shared safety mission. The GA community has been willing to roll up their sleeves and ask, How can we fix this together? With that kind of attitude, I know we can tackle anything that comes our way and get ever closer to the day when general aviation fatalities are a thing of the past.

FAA and EASA Update Aviation Safety Agreement

October 19 Safety in todays global aviation market depends to a great extent on international partnerships between aviation regulators. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) fully subscribes to this philosophy, which is why on September 22 the agency updated its long-standing aviation safety agreement with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)

The changes in this agreement enhance the risk-based approach to safety by optimizing reliance on each authoritys expertise in aircraft certification through Revision 6 of the Technical Implementation Procedures (TIP). The revision will go into effect six months from the signing date of September 22, 2017.

Typically, the FAA and EASA do not completely duplicate each others certification of aircraft products, instead each entity performs a validation of certification activities. The new TIP revision will permit increased acceptance of approvals without technical involvement by the authority conducting the validation. In certain cases, the revised TIP also will allow a streamlined validation process to expedite issuance of a type certificate without technical review. These changes give both the FAA and EASA the opportunity to have even greater reliance on the regulatory capabilities and the technical competencies of one anothers aircraft certification systems.

When technical involvement is necessary to validate a product, a work plan will now be required to define the extent of the validating authoritys involvement. This provides a structured approach using program management principles to ensure accountability to the bilateral agreement.

Revision 6 of the TIP contributes directly to the FAAs overall vision of global leadership by promoting international partnerships to reduce barriers and leads the advancement of aviation safety across geopolitical boundaries.

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control

October 19The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign is designed to educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

Surviving a Crash
Every pilot needs to prepare for the unexpected. Although surviving a crash is one of those I hope it never happens events, its something you need to consider both for yourself, and your passengers. If something happens, your passengers will look to you for leadership and survival.

This edition of FlySafe offers a few important survival tips, but the FAA recommends supplementing this information with the appropriate training and preparation. A number of courses are available, including a one-day, post-crash survival course tailored for GA pilots offered by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI).

This course, and others like it, are designed to introduce you to the knowledge and skills you need to cope with various common survival scenarios. This course also teaches students how to assemble and use a personal survival kit.

Were On the GroundWhat Next?!
The unexpected happened, and you were forced to put your plane down. You survived!! Your passengers appear to be ok, too. Do you know what to do next?

A common acronym that can help is STOP. Stop. Think. Observe. Plan.

Stop: Your adrenaline is flowing. Once you and your passengers are safely away from the aircraft, try to calm down. Avoid panicking.

Think: Prioritize your next moves. First, are there any life-threatening injuries? What resources do you have for first aid? Can you signal for help?

Observe: You need shelter to survive, so start surveying your surroundings. Do you have food or water available? Can you start a fire? Do you know how much time there is before nightfall?

Plan: Conserve your energy. Focus all of your efforts on the common goal of survival and rescue. Plan for your immediate needs of first aid, sheltering from the elements, signaling for help and ensuring all in your party are safe. If possible, stay with or near the aircraft to improve your chances of being found.

Calm, thoughtful action is what will help you survive the time until rescue.

Survival Kit
No matter where you fly, you should always equip your aircraft with a survival kit. There are several that are available commercially, but you can also assemble a personal survival kit that is custom-tailored to your mission.

Some common items youll want to make sure you have in your aircraft include: a multi-tool or knife, a flashlight with extra batteries, rope, a signaling device, a compass, first aid kit, waterproof matches, bug repellant, and gloves. Be sure to have some water and non-perishable food as well in case you might have to wait some time before being rescued. Carrying some of these items in a fishing or survival vest is a good idea, as you may only be able to walk away from the aircraft with the clothes on your back. And dont forget to leave room in your vest for a 406 MHz personal locator beacon. These relatively low-cost devices are a great adjunct to the aircrafts emergency locator transmitter.

Speaking of clothing, this is one area often overlooked when it comes to surviving an aircraft accident. As clothing is your primary shelter in a survival situation, plan your attire accordingly for all areas and weather conditions along your route of flight. Dressing in layers is always a good idea. That way you can adjust as conditions change. Consider cotton or wool outer garments rather than synthetics, trousers rather than shorts or skirts, and closed toe shoes rather than sandals.

If you are traveling over water, or traveling internationally, its a very good idea to have life rafts or life preservers on board. The FAA has no specific requirement for GA aircraft to carry these items, but ICAO requires them when traveling internationally.

Another critical tip for improving your chances for survival is to file a flight plan, even when flying VFR. This enables flight tracking and means that emergency services will be alerted should you not arrive at your destination when expected.

Finally, there is one item that tops every successful survivors list. Its considered by experts to be the prime factor in determining whether one lives or dies. It weighs nothing and its always available. It is the will to survive.

What is Loss of Control (LOC)?
A LOC accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

Message from FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta:
The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #Fly Safe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

More about Loss of Control
Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • In 2016, 413 people died in 219 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:
The FAAs space Medical Institute or CAMI, offers a one-day post-crash survival course for general aviation pilots and passengers. Its designed to introduce you to the knowledge and skills you need to cope with various common survival scenarios. This course also teaches students how to assemble and use a personal survival kit. For more information, visit our Airman Education Programs page.

The FAA Safety Briefing magazine has published two issues on emergency preparedness. For specifics on GA accident survival, check out the articles What Would MacGyver Do? in the July/Aug 2013 issue and Survival 101 in the Nov/Dec 2010 issue.

Check out GA Safety Enhancements fact sheets on the mainFAA Safety Briefing website., including one on GA Survival here.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars and more on key general aviation safety topics, including aviation survival courses. They also host a number GA survival resources, including an Off-Airport Operations Guide here.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

AOPA has a number of videos and publications on crash survival and resources for crash survival equipment.

Read AOPAs Training for the Unthinkable for a first-person account of survival.

AOPAs Steep Consequences, Life-Saving Tips is another excellent read.

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